Skip to main content

Library Displays: The Power of Kern County

Monthly displays in the library.

Introduction

The Power of Kern

Loading ...

Energy Careers

How to Become a Geological or Petroleum Technician

Image result for petroleum technician

Geological and petroleum technicians use laboratory equipment such as microscopes to analyze samples collected in the field.

Geological and petroleum technicians typically need an associate’s degree or 2 years of postsecondary training in applied science or science-related technology. Some jobs may require a bachelor’s degree. Geological and petroleum technicians also receive on-the-job training.

Education

Although some entry-level positions require only a high school diploma, most employers prefer applicants who have at least an associate’s degree or 2 years of postsecondary training in applied science or a science-related technology. Geological and petroleum technician jobs that are data intensive or otherwise highly technical may require a bachelor’s degree.

Taft College Energy Technology Program

The Energy Technology program is designed to provide training and education in technical and professional skills to enable individuals to work in the energy industry. Technicians with the education and training can provide support and assistance to engineers, geologists, and operations staff in a variety of career and job types. Skills attained will be transferrable to other related profession such as manufacturing, food processing, renewable/alternative energy fields, etc.

For more information on what Taft College has to offer click here.

 

 

Source Credit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Geological and Petroleum Technicians,
on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/geological-and-petroleum-technicians.htm (visited December 18, 2019). Energy Technology Mission Statement, http://www.taftcollege.edu/cte/energy-technology/

How to Become a Solar Photovoltaic Installer

Most photovoltaic installers learn on the job working with experienced installers.

There are multiple paths to becoming a solar photovoltaic (PV) installer, often called a PV installer. Most workers need a high school diploma and receive on-the-job training lasting up to 1 year. Other candidates take courses at a technical school or community college. Some PV installers learn to install panels as part of an apprenticeship.

Education

Most employers require PV installers to have a high school diploma. Some PV installers take courses at local community colleges or trade schools to learn about solar panel installation. Courses range from basic safety and PV knowledge to system design. Although course lengths vary by state and locality, most usually last a few days to several months.

Some candidates may enter the field by taking online training courses. This option is particularly useful for candidates with prior construction experience, such as former electricians.

Taft College Energy Technology Program

The Energy Technology program is designed to provide training and education in technical and professional skills to enable individuals to work in the energy industry. Technicians with the education and training can provide support and assistance to engineers, geologists, and operations staff in a variety of career and job types. Skills attained will be transferrable to other related profession such as manufacturing, food processing, renewable/alternative energy fields, etc.

For more information on what Taft College has to offer click here.

 

 Source Credit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Solar Photovoltaic Installers,
on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/construction-and-extraction/solar-photovoltaic-installers.htm (visited December 16, 2019). Energy Technology Mission Statement, http://www.taftcollege.edu/cte/energy-technology/

How to Become a Wind Turbine Technician

Wind turbine technicians receive on-the-job training from experienced workers.

Most wind turbine service technicians, also known as windtechs, learn their trade by attending a technical school. They are also trained by their employer after hiring.

Education

Most windtechs learn their trade by attending technical schools or community colleges, where they typically complete certificates in wind energy technology, although some workers choose to earn an associate’s degree.

Many technical schools have onsite wind turbines that students can work on as part of their studies. In addition to lab coursework, other areas of focus that reflect the various skill sets needed to do the job include the following:

  • Rescue, safety, first aid, and CPR training
  • Electrical maintenance
  • Hydraulic maintenance
  • Braking systems
  • Mechanical systems, including blade inspection and maintenance
  • Computers and programmable logic control systems

Taft College Energy Technology Program

The Energy Technology program is designed to provide training and education in technical and professional skills to enable individuals to work in the energy industry. Technicians with the education and training can provide support and assistance to engineers, geologists, and operations staff in a variety of career and job types. Skills attained will be transferrable to other related profession such as manufacturing, food processing, renewable/alternative energy fields, etc.

For more information on what Taft College has to offer click here.

 

Source Credit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Wind Turbine Technicians,
on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/wind-turbine-technicians.htm (visited December 13, 2019). Energy Technology Mission Statement, http://www.taftcollege.edu/cte/energy-technology/

How to Become a Power Plant Operator, Distributor, or Dispatcher

Most power plant operators work at a control station.

Power plant operators, distributors, and dispatchers typically need a high school diploma or equivalent combined with extensive on-the-job training, which may include a combination of classroom and hands-on training. Many jobs require a background check and screenings for drugs and alcohol.

Nuclear power reactor operators also need a license.

Many companies require prospective workers to take the Power Plant Maintenance and Plant Operator exams from the Edison Electrical Institute to see if they have the right aptitudes for this work. These tests measure reading comprehension, understanding of mechanical concepts, spatial ability, and mathematical ability.

Education

Power plant operators, distributors, and dispatchers typically need at least a high school diploma or equivalent. However, employers may prefer workers who have a college or vocational school degree.

Taft College Energy Technology Program

The Energy Technology program is designed to provide training and education in technical and professional skills to enable individuals to work in the energy industry. Technicians with the education and training can provide support and assistance to engineers, geologists, and operations staff in a variety of career and job types. Skills attained will be transferrable to other related profession such as manufacturing, food processing, renewable/alternative energy fields, etc.

For more information on what Taft College has to offer click here.

Source Credit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Power Plant Operators, Distributors, and Dispatchers,
on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/production/power-plant-operators-distributors-and-dispatchers.htm (visited December 13, 2019). Energy Technology Mission Statement, http://www.taftcollege.edu/cte/energy-technology/

Loading ...